Jack Colvin Archive

"You must permeate your mind and body with artistic qualities"

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Jack Colvin and Sharon Gless during Performance of ‘Fathers and Sons’ - March 18, 1980 at Solri Theater in New York City, New York, United States. (Photo by Ron Galella/WireImage)

http://www.gettyimages.in/detail/news-photo/jack-colvin-and-sharon-gless-during-performance-of-fathers-news-photo/106086141
I can’t wait to afford this, but even watermarked, you get the gist. It’ll look so much better without, though…

Jack Colvin and Sharon Gless during Performance of ‘Fathers and Sons’ - March 18, 1980 at Solri Theater in New York City, New York, United States. (Photo by Ron Galella/WireImage)

http://www.gettyimages.in/detail/news-photo/jack-colvin-and-sharon-gless-during-performance-of-fathers-news-photo/106086141

I can’t wait to afford this, but even watermarked, you get the gist. It’ll look so much better without, though…

Filed under jack colvin sharon gless fathers and sons 1980 1980s Solri theater photos

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Colvin and Wilder combine in a sketch about two people on different wavelengths.

-Dean Hosts the Kids Next Door, Schenectady Gazette, Mar 23, 1968
Yeah, not much to this one, as that’s as vague a description of a skit can get, but the last bit of odd quaintness from Peter Tork that was apparently interesting enough to merit a section of its own in the entertainment section makes it worth it.

Colvin and Wilder combine in a sketch about two people on different wavelengths.

-Dean Hosts the Kids Next Door, Schenectady Gazette, Mar 23, 1968

Yeah, not much to this one, as that’s as vague a description of a skit can get, but the last bit of odd quaintness from Peter Tork that was apparently interesting enough to merit a section of its own in the entertainment section makes it worth it.

Filed under jack colvin Yvonne Wilder yvonne othon Colvin and Othon Colvin and Wilder dean martin the dean martin show peter tork the monkees press 1960s 1968

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Top photo of Jack Colvin and Sharon Gless from personal collection, by unknown, unknown date, unknown place. Maybe the Emmys in the early 80s? Who knows. There is another picture of the two from 1980, but I don’t have Getty money.

—-

Part of Sharon’s uncertainty is because she has experienced several difficult love affairs over the past few years. She was in love for six years with top Hollywood producer, director and actor Jack Colvin. Then it broke up, just when everybody expected them to marry.
"I still feel a lot of pain," Sharon admits, "but I only hope I’ve learned something from all that unhappiness.

-Cagney and Lacey and Daly and Gless, by Joann Wills, The Sydney Morning Herald, Oct 14, 1985

This is probably as gossip-rag-y as it gets here, but there it is. Interestingly, Sharon Gless was at Jack’s last appearance, the Chekhov book release party.

Filed under jack colvin sharon gless cagney and lacey emmys press 1985 1980s photos Personal collection

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Jack Colvin (of the comedy team of Colvin & Wilder) is a top contender to play the role of “Hickok” in “In Cold Blood.” He conferred with author Truman Capote last week

-Mrs. Huntington Hartford Turns Deaf Ear To Reconciliation, by Walter Winchell, Sarasota Journal, Jun 6, 1966
Okay, maybe this is the most gossipy thing posted, hence the extra context in the image. Still, Jack Colvin instead of Scott Wilson, plus the idea of him and Truman Capote “conferring” is interesting. What a conversation.

Jack Colvin (of the comedy team of Colvin & Wilder) is a top contender to play the role of “Hickok” in “In Cold Blood.” He conferred with author Truman Capote last week

-Mrs. Huntington Hartford Turns Deaf Ear To Reconciliation, by Walter Winchell, Sarasota Journal, Jun 6, 1966

Okay, maybe this is the most gossipy thing posted, hence the extra context in the image. Still, Jack Colvin instead of Scott Wilson, plus the idea of him and Truman Capote “conferring” is interesting. What a conversation.

Filed under jack colvin in cold blood scott wilson truman capote walter winchell Colvin and Wilder 1966 1960s dick hickock press

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Colvin Lewis A (Nan) mach h2905 Kelburn av

-Los Angeles Directory Co.’s Wilmar-Garvey District Directory, 1949
Unfortunately, while this would have been Lewis A, Nannie, and Jack’s home then, I don’t think the address exists anymore. It appears that Kelburn turns into a parking lot before their address. But! Here Lewis seems to be listed as a machinist, so he’s still paying bills with blue collar work in LA.

Colvin Lewis A (Nan) mach h2905 Kelburn av

-Los Angeles Directory Co.’s Wilmar-Garvey District Directory, 1949

Unfortunately, while this would have been Lewis A, Nannie, and Jack’s home then, I don’t think the address exists anymore. It appears that Kelburn turns into a parking lot before their address. But! Here Lewis seems to be listed as a machinist, so he’s still paying bills with blue collar work in LA.

Filed under lewis colvin nan colvin jack colvin 1949 1940s directory public records

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Anonymous asked: Thank you so much for this wonderful blog on my all-time favorite actor, Jack Colvin. I have recently begun doing some research on his family genealogy and some of your finds here have been a great help. I was thrilled to come across this beautiful tribute and have spent the better part of a day reading and re-reading its contents. Thank you for proving to me that I am not the only one who was utterly captivated by his talent when I first saw him in a small role many decades ago.

Oh, well, I’ve dabbled in a bit of it, too, so this might help. This isn’t TOTALLY up to date, either. For one, Lewis A Colvin’s mother up there is actually his adopted mother, who was pretty old. Estimating by all the census evidence, he lived with her until he married Nan. some time after 25. Nan’s guardian was listed as O. P. Davis (the only one of which I could find died in Mississippi), and her siblings were… nearly impossible to read. The trouble is you have so many leads it’s hard remembering to update those that seem to be confirmed.

Sorry for the late reply, by the by! I’ve got something like a week of updates starting tonight. Some a great, some are just okay, but they’re still updates!

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Anonymous asked: Did Jack and Bill Bixby keep in touch after The Hulk series finished?

I’m not sure, but probably not. He spoke about Bill helping Colvin to get the McGee character fleshed out on the show, but not much beyond that. Lou Ferrigno’s autobiography and interviews pretty much say he was nice but incredibly quiet. As a side note, since last updating this site, I met Lou at one of the many conventions he’s been to. Because of his general “please make this short” demeanor, I just didn’t try asking anything.

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Jack Colvin, a popular character actor who co-starred with Bill Bixby as the abrasive tabloid reporter Jack McGee in the 1970s television series “The Incredible Hulk,” has died. He was 71.

Colvin died Thursday in a North Hollywood nursing home of complications following a stroke he suffered Oct. 22.

The “Hulk” series, based on the Marvel Comics hero, ran from 1977 to 1982 on CBS, featuring Bixby as a scientist frustrated and angry over being too weak to save his wife’s life in a car crash. He subjects himself to gamma rays to explore extraordinary strength, and when he becomes enraged, turns into a most un-jolly green giant (played by bodybuilder Lou Ferrigno).

Colvin, who had a long history as a stage actor, was dubious about the series when he was asked to sign on.

"When they told me the title, I laughed…. But then they gave me two scripts to read and I knew the series would go," he told The Times shortly before the series ended. "People identify tremendously with the frustration, the rage and the anger that breaks out in a man."

Times reviewer Kevin Thomas wrote when the series began in 1977 that it “is incredible, all right — but that doesn’t mean it isn’t also lots of fun and even poignant besides.”

Thomas and other reviewers praised Colvin’s work as McGee, with one even commending the actor for doing “more with this character than it probably deserves.”

Colvin also directed a few episodes of the series.

A native of Lyndon, Kan., Colvin moved to Los Angeles with his family at an early age and became a child stage actor. At age 17 he became a private student of the actor and teacher Michael Chekhov, and later taught the Chekhov acting technique at USC, Cal State Northridge, the American Academy of Dramatic Arts and the Central School of Cinematography in Rome.

In the 1960s, Colvin teamed with Yvonne Wilder as a comedy duo, Colvin and Wilder, performing at Ye Little Club in Beverly Hills and on television variety shows.

Colvin’s other television work included appearances in “The Rat Patrol,” “Kojak,” “The Six Million Dollar Man,” “The Rockford Files,” “Quincy,” “Cagney and Lacey” and “Murder, She Wrote.” On the big screen, he had minor roles in several films, including “Scorpio” and “Rooster Cogburn.”

An active member of Theatre East in Studio City for 20 years, Colvin directed such productions as “Dead End at Sunset” in 1990 and acted in many others. The theater company staged “Girly, Girly and The Real McCoy,” which Colvin wrote.

He was prominent in other small theaters locally, directing plays ranging from his former partner Wilder’s comedy “Weehawken” at the Tiffany in 1988 to Shakespeare’s “Hamlet” at the Melrose Theater in 1993.

At the time of his death, Colvin was the artistic director of the Michael Chekhov Studio, USA West.

He had no immediate survivors.

-Jack Colvin, 71; Known for Role in TV’s ‘Hulk’, by Myrna Oliver, Los Angeles Times, December 5, 2005

Still the best source of info as far as obituaries go, and likely the only one worth posting.

Filed under press jack colvin obituary 2005 2000s Los Angeles Times The Incredible Hulk jack mcgee

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Young people should laugh a little, say comedians Yvonne Wilder and Jack Colvin."Too many high school and college kids are socially involved in being serious," explains Colvin.That would be all to the good, he says, except that lots of them just go along with it because it is the vogue. It may be good for the movements in which they are involved, but it isn’t always good for certain individuals, he says."Seriousness can get to be a disease when it is a pose. Lots of young people have the courage of their convictions, but they don’t seem to have real convictions," in Colvin’s opinion.Yvonne and Jack are a popular team on the nightclub and television circuit, and what they like about their act is that kids dig it."People are much healthier when they have a sense of humor about everything," says Yvonne. High school drama societies should concentrate on more shows "that poke fun at everything," rather than playing up all the serious aspects of life. Kids get a great kick out of satirizing family life and so on. It’s one way to look at the brighter side."The two have been in show business all their lives. Yvonne is a dancer and choreographer — she toured Europe in “West Side Story.” Colvin directed the Menotti Opera Festival in Pasadena, played for two seasons with the Oregon Shakespearean Festival and in the controversial drama, “The Deputy.”If it’s any encouragement to school comedians who spend a great deal of time in the principal’s office, Yvonne and Jack had the same difficulty."It was a meeting of two D-minuses in conduct," explains Yvonne. They met when Colvin was teaching a class in method acting."All the camp and trivia young people are going for now, including old comedians jokes, shows that the folk lessons of childhood have resulted in nostalgia," says Colvin. Hollywood is missing a bet in not inviting more slapstick, kids love it, he points out."Silent comedy was one of America’s art forms. No other country did it like the United States — Buster Keaton, Harold Lloyd, Harry Langdon. They were unique. Laurel and Hardy were are greatest comedians in his opinion.One reason the stage couldn’t do it quite the same way, was he points out, because the motion picture camera came along with inventions it could poke fun at —telephone, automobiles, airplanes. It was a kind of impact the stage had never known and couldn’t provide — sending a car off a mountain, a plane into the ocean or heroes hanging on cliffs.Outer space can’t provide this perilous fun for comedy because people can’t identify with it. But other areas of comedy should be explored, say Yvonne and Jack.Their own show is satirical. Colvin writes it and Yvonne gives suggestions from time to time. Their three-year relationship has been a traveling one — 30 television appearances and night club acts.

-SAYS COMEDIAN: Teens Need to Laugh More [or YOUTHS CAN CARRY IT TOO FAR - Severity Can Be Disease or ‘Laugh, Kids, Laugh’ Advise Comedians or Make Room For Fun], by Vivian Brown, AP Newsfeatures, July 1966

Strange quotation mark use regardless, this was a great (and surprisingly good at hiding) find.

Young people should laugh a little, say comedians Yvonne Wilder and Jack Colvin.
"Too many high school and college kids are socially involved in being serious," explains Colvin.
That would be all to the good, he says, except that lots of them just go along with it because it is the vogue. It may be good for the movements in which they are involved, but it isn’t always good for certain individuals, he says.
"Seriousness can get to be a disease when it is a pose. Lots of young people have the courage of their convictions, but they don’t seem to have real convictions," in Colvin’s opinion.
Yvonne and Jack are a popular team on the nightclub and television circuit, and what they like about their act is that kids dig it.
"People are much healthier when they have a sense of humor about everything," says Yvonne. High school drama societies should concentrate on more shows "that poke fun at everything," rather than playing up all the serious aspects of life. Kids get a great kick out of satirizing family life and so on. It’s one way to look at the brighter side."
The two have been in show business all their lives. Yvonne is a dancer and choreographer — she toured Europe in “West Side Story.” Colvin directed the Menotti Opera Festival in Pasadena, played for two seasons with the Oregon Shakespearean Festival and in the controversial drama, “The Deputy.”
If it’s any encouragement to school comedians who spend a great deal of time in the principal’s office, Yvonne and Jack had the same difficulty.
"It was a meeting of two D-minuses in conduct," explains Yvonne. They met when Colvin was teaching a class in method acting.
"All the camp and trivia young people are going for now, including old comedians jokes, shows that the folk lessons of childhood have resulted in nostalgia," says Colvin. Hollywood is missing a bet in not inviting more slapstick, kids love it, he points out.
"Silent comedy was one of America’s art forms. No other country did it like the United States — Buster Keaton, Harold Lloyd, Harry Langdon. They were unique. Laurel and Hardy were are greatest comedians in his opinion.
One reason the stage couldn’t do it quite the same way, was he points out, because the motion picture camera came along with inventions it could poke fun at —telephone, automobiles, airplanes. It was a kind of impact the stage had never known and couldn’t provide — sending a car off a mountain, a plane into the ocean or heroes hanging on cliffs.
Outer space can’t provide this perilous fun for comedy because people can’t identify with it. But other areas of comedy should be explored, say Yvonne and Jack.
Their own show is satirical. Colvin writes it and Yvonne gives suggestions from time to time. Their three-year relationship has been a traveling one — 30 television appearances and night club acts.

-SAYS COMEDIAN: Teens Need to Laugh More [or YOUTHS CAN CARRY IT TOO FAR - Severity Can Be Disease or ‘Laugh, Kids, Laugh’ Advise Comedians or Make Room For Fun], by Vivian Brown, AP Newsfeatures, July 1966

Strange quotation mark use regardless, this was a great (and surprisingly good at hiding) find.

Filed under jack colvin Yvonne Wilder yvonne othon Colvin and Wilder Colvin and Othon press 1960s 1966 photos